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Dehydrated meat

Tags

dried food

dried meat

preservation

honey

enzymes

eskimos

indians

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[2007]

[Attendee]

Dehydrating the meat a little.

[Aajonus]

Okay. If you dehydrate the meat, you lose your enzymes and a lot of the ability to utilize your proteins and digest in general.

[Attendee #2]

So, beef jerky is bad?

[Aajonus]

Beef jerky is terrible. But if he wants to let his meat dry a little bit, it's not going to be that bad.

Just eat a little honey with it, to add some enzymes.

Yeah, they'll just leave it out on a plate. They do that a lot done a lot in Pangai, in Hawaii. A lot of the people don't like the fresh tasting meat. They like it slightly dried.

[Attendee]

You could run a fan over it right?

[Aajonus]

Yeah. But still, when you're dehydrating, you're losing the electromagnetic energy, the field of energy of that food.

It's like the Indians every year, the Eskimos and the Inuit and the Canadian Indians will make a pemmican. They'll dry meat, beat it until it becomes a flour and then mix it with some kind of a lard, whether it's some buffalo, seal, whatever they have available, and they bake it in the sun till it melts together, and then they press it into a 90 pound cube, and they will keep that throughout the whole winter incase they can't find any food for the hunt. If they don't need to eat it, whatever they don't eat during the winter, they bury it in the spring. They don't eat it. Even though they've gone to all this great length to have this dry meat and go through this whole process, it is just for survival.

They know that it will leach enzymes and lots of properties out of the body and will weaken the body. So, they bury it. They will not eat it. They only eat it if they're starving.

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